The Most Powerful Music Promotion [You Never Heard Of]

The world’s largest online sharing community

Can you guess the number one place people go to share links, pictures, and videos?

Is it Facebook?

Instagram? Snap?

What do you think?  

Don’t check Google…  Stay with me.

I’ll give you a hint.  It’s not a social media platform.

Darkness Falls over 2020

According to Olivia Valentine of GlobalWebIndex, “When consumers have something to share, they’re more likely to head to dark social channels to do so (63%) rather than open social media platforms (54%).”

‘What the hell is dark social,’ you ask.

Let me put you at ease

It’s not a place to watch snuff films.  

To buy Altcoins…

Or to have a bag of weed drop-shipped to your Mom’s house by FedEx.

Dark Social is when people share content through private channels such as instant messaging programs, messaging apps, and email. 

This private sharing is harder to track than content shared on public platforms such as Facebook and Twitter, so many social media marketers don’t realize how big of a slice Dark Social has of the social media sharing pie,” explains Cydney Hatch of Disruptiveadvertising.com.

Social media isn’t declining because people have decided to share less, they’ve just changed how they share. 

That doesn’t mean delete all your social media accounts, but do take time to build personal connections, sharing with people on dark social.  

Dark Social sharing Statistics Chart

Build a community of supporters

I’ve already started using dark social to create a deeper connection with my readers and artist clients, and it’s already making an impact.

The best part of segmenting fans into dark social channels is that with the right development, you can build an army of free supporters, loving, sharing, rating, and defending your music online and off.

Now I’m going to show you how to do it.

It starts with a common purpose–something to believe in

If you’re making music, intent on communicating with a lot of people, what are you going to say to them?

Is your music about life on the streets?

The pain of drug abuse?

Or the importance of loving our environment?

These are just examples, but the point is to think about what it is you want to say to the world.

There’s no wrong answer.

The Liberators

For Musician/Producer/DJ, GRiZ, the message he believes in and wants to share is: “Show Love, Spread Love.” 

He has designed his brand, music, and a community around people who believe this philosophy and want to express it.

From his website, GRiZ explains, “The Liberators are individuals who support GRiZ, his music, and embody “Show Love Spread Love” by serving local communities and by connecting and empowering each other in daily life, shows/festivals, and in the digital world.”

When his community gets together, they’re not just music fans, they’re spending time with like-minded people, spreading a positive message that has the potential to impact their environment.

Gathering the troops

The hardest thing is getting your first real follower.  Although the narration of this video (below) is explaining leadership, it’s an excellent way to see the dynamics of social momentum playing out.

And a good metaphor on how to build fans from scratch.

dynamic of the first follower

Your first real fan can come from many different places.  

In an interview with Talent Manager Jake Udell, he explained how his clients Krewella would personally message and connect with every person who liked or commented on their Facebook posts.

When you’re at the start of building fans, don’t hide in the studio, boosting posts at a distance from fans.

Engage them. Thank fans personally and ask them questions about their life, their projects, and passions. Give them your phone number.

Eventually, if your music is good and you genuinely care about your fans, you will reach a point where you can no longer communicate with everyone on a personal level.

According to Dunbar’s number, we humans can only comfortably maintain about 150 stable relationships. 

150 is a lot. Imagine you can send a text, and 150 people show up at your local club? Or they all add your new release to their playlists?

Tech tools like Superphone.io are using automation to extend that 150 to a much larger number. (We’ll cover this more in a future blog)

What tools do you use for communicating with fans and followers? Let me know in the comments, I love to learn what you’re using.

Conclusion

Now that you’ve learned that the majority of sharing online happens off of social networks, this is an opportunity for you to grow a closer community of supporters who share and promote your music on dark social.

I also wanted you to see how artists like GRiZ can attract a massive live following by uniting fans under an affirmative message.

And most importantly, I hope you understand the importance of making real connections with fans. 

By making yourself available and showing interest in the people who engage with you, you can gain fans, friends, supporters, and have your own power to share music with the world.

If you found this information helpful, please spread the love and share it with others by clicking on the social share links.

Artist Tools Signup Form
  • For those new to the community, you can subscribe to these weekly tips by submitting your email above.

4 thoughts on “The Most Powerful Music Promotion [You Never Heard Of]

    • Josh Post author

      Glad you found some of it useful. Thanks for your comment.

Comments are closed.